Will Boris survive the year?

Share:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
In his first blog of 2021, Frank Mckenna asks if Boris Johnson will survive the year as Prime Minister.

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]It would have been slim pickings for Boris Johnson if, any point over Christmas, he reflected on his achievements for 2020. He eventually got a Brexit deal over the line, although there are many a conversation and negotiation to be had with our former EU partners over a whole range of issues still to come – and he did, of course, survive COVID-19.

Overcoming the virus may prove to be an easier task than winning back the support of a growing number of discontented Conservative MPs, who have gone from seeing the Prime Minister as an election winning machine to a man who is out of his depth within the space of twelve months. He may be good at ‘getting’ jobs – but he’s not very good at doing them.

If he hits his latest self-imposed target of the country being released from our third national lockdown by Easter, then he has half a chance. However, given that he and his government have missed every other single self- imposed target they have set themselves since last March, a betting man wouldn’t put money on it.

The one thing that you have to give Johnson credit for, however, is his resilience. He has survived more personal faux pars and scandals than any modern-day politician, from extra marital affairs to conspiring to beat up a journalist. So, even the most confident of gamblers would not put their shirt, tucked-in or otherwise, on a change of Conservative leadership just yet.

Nonetheless, we are only a year into his five-year term. Already he has reigned over a catalogue of unmitigated disasters in respect of the virus, lost several of his key advisors and, reportedly, had a number of ‘no confidence’ letters sent to the chairman of the 1922 Tory backbench committee against him. The latest round of polls will also have been sobering for Conservatives too, particularly in those much talked about red wall seats. Labour is a different proposition and a more credible opposition under the leadership of Keir Starmer.

Like all of us, Boris Johnson will be hoping for a much better 2021 than 2020. But, like many others, he will start the New Year anxious about wether he will still be in a job by the end of it.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_raw_html]JTNDYSUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwcyUzQSUyRiUyRnR3aXR0ZXIuY29tJTJGRG93bnRvd25GcmFuayUzRnJlZl9zcmMlM0R0d3NyYyUyNTVFdGZ3JTIyJTIwY2xhc3MlM0QlMjJ0d2l0dGVyLWZvbGxvdy1idXR0b24lMjIlMjBkYXRhLXNob3ctY291bnQlM0QlMjJmYWxzZSUyMiUzRUZvbGxvdyUyMCU0MERvd250b3duRnJhbmslM0MlMkZhJTNFJTNDc2NyaXB0JTIwYXN5bmMlMjBzcmMlM0QlMjJodHRwcyUzQSUyRiUyRnBsYXRmb3JtLnR3aXR0ZXIuY29tJTJGd2lkZ2V0cy5qcyUyMiUyMGNoYXJzZXQlM0QlMjJ1dGYtOCUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRnNjcmlwdCUzRQ==[/vc_raw_html][/vc_column][/vc_row]

No more lockdowns please

People need to seriously look at the wider implications of lockdowns before campaigning for another period of uber restrictions, argues Frank McKenna in his latest Downtown blog.

Read More

The Business of Politics

As a DIB poll finds that most business leaders feel abandoned by the political parties, Frank McKenna asks if Andy Street’s suggestion, that more entrepreneurs should go into politics, is the answer?

Read More

“OH JEREMY JOHNSON, OH JEREMY JOHNSON…”

Who or what is Boris Johnson? The ‘Heir to Blair’, Jeremy Corbyn’s soulmate, or a bowl of spaghetti? Mama Mia, Francesco Mckenna tries to navigate us through the complicated recipe that is our Prime Minister. Not too much parmesan please – and easy on the garlic.

Read More